Snow and Ice-and Something Nice

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This is the coldest morning of the year-the coldest morning in many years, actually.  It may be the coldest morning of my life.  The lovely snow is ice now.  Schools are closed and so I am by the morning table watching the sun light the rabbit patch up.  It is a beautiful morning to behold.  You can hear a truck a mile away in this silence.  

The boys made it home yesterday afternoon.  Both of them nearly got stuck in the yard, so wood must be brought in on foot. There are no sidewalks at the rabbit patch, so I expect a good deal of the rabbit patch soil to end up on the floors of the old farm house.

I have an agenda , in spite of the sense that all motion has ceased in the community around the rabbit patch.  Soup is on the stove already simmering and if I can get out from under the heated blanket, I will make cornbread.  Kyle will convince me to make cinnamon buns, at some point. He, like Moon Shine, must eat all day to stay alive.

I hope to call an old friend today and actually have a leisure conversation.  This may be one of the few luxuries that the ice affords. I find it ironic, that before dish washers and dryers, microwaves and instant potatoes, people had time to visit.  My mama and grandmama visited  “Mama Hodges” and Aunt Agnes every week. Miss Delphie came over too, who could” find things growing on a ditch bank and make an arrangement fit for Sundays’ Church services” so grandmama said. The women talked, traded recipes and probably solved a lot of the worlds’ problems while the children played outside in unhindered free play.   That was something nice.  The gathering broke up in late morning, so  the twelve o’clock “dinner” could be prepared.  There were no canned biscuits either, then-and cakes did not come in boxes.  

This was really only fifty years ago, and it startles to me to think how things have so dramatically changed.  Grandmama had a “saying” she quoted often-“Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water.”  It meant while you were throwing things out or changing something up, you might lose the most precious thing about it-and I fear we may do that – and often.  Of course, childhood has changed too.  No one worried about training us for the Olympics and we played our ball games in back yards while the adults made ice cream.  It is quite an occasion to see an unorganized ball game in a back yard now, I notice.  Of course, I grew up in the rural USA, and I take that in to consideration, but still I wonder how people grew vegetables, canned them, hung clothes on lines, tended to their children at home and still had time to visit on a Tuesday morning.   

I guess when ice covers the world outside of the back door and as far as can be seen, I remember that I tend to go “kicking and screaming” in to the modern world, on the best of days.  I like the great advancements in medicine and communications.  I like convenience too-it just seems like we lost something beautiful, on the way to “here” and we might ought to go back and look for it -or maybe Thomas Wolfe was right, after all, when he said “You can’t go home again.”

No matter, how I got here, I hope to always grow tomatoes in the spring and can them in late summer.  I will decorate cakes with wild violets and  eat on china instead of paper.  In this way, I will tell Lyla, and all of those after her, the story of those before her. . . Her great great grandmother Edna was right and   so  I will do my best, to “not throw the baby out with the bath water.”

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35 thoughts on “Snow and Ice-and Something Nice

  1. It seems the more time we have ‘spare’ the less sensibly we use it, perhaps it is for the likes of you & myself to teach the next generation the best of both worlds we have been fortunate to inhabit, modern conveniences and time honoured traditions ..enjoy your time well xx

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Part of my blog is dedicated to Gelfling Grandson so when he’s a man he can look back at out times together and the simple things that filled our time, the ordinary things that made our lives extra ordinary to us ….well that’s the idea at least

        Liked by 2 people

  2. When we were young it did seem that there was more time for the pleasure of female companionship. I agree, I like all the modern conveniences but we should also try to keep in our lives the simpler and finer moments of life. I noticed I can’t subscribe by Email to your blog and keep missing you in the reader which makes me sad.

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  3. Curiously, I was recently thinking of the word “pastime”.
    Clearly there was a time when we needed something to fill in those spaces and “pass time”.
    I won’t jump on the bandwagon that says all these things are gone.
    I’ll cling to Leprechauns’ coat-tails and and chase fairies in the woods, and show grandchildren, by living example, how life ought to be.

    Stay warm,

    Paz

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Do you ever wish you could go back to the past for a day – just to see if it is still your cup of tea. I do. The youth of today are on a mad path with technology. They are beginning to lose the art of socializing. Sitting in the shade of a tree and talking face to face. Taking a stroll through the woods – away from cellphones. Ah, I remember that peaceful time of the long gone past. Who started me on computers, cellphones, etc. – My daughter and granddaughter. :).

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    1. As quickly as the thought of going to the past crosses my mind, I realize that “the past” may be seen with rose-colored glasses.
      I would not want to go back to a time when people were treated as subhuman because of the color of their skin or their desire to marry someone of the same gender. Nor a time when one in five children diagnosed with cancer was likely to live. Now the survival rate is 80%.

      Without this technology, we would be unable to have this lovely exchange.
      There’s something to say for the present.

      Seek peace,

      Paz

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Nor would I, though I do miss the less rushed times and the family time. I had never herd of cancer or alzheimers as a child. But, I do remain thankful of medical advancements, I guess I miss when it seemed we owned our time and didnt get over obligated. Thank you for reading and best wishes to both of us for bright futures.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I am not denying we have advanced in technology and life is easier. But I loved my childhood with my 2 brothers – being outside, letting nature fulfill our lives. Everyone looks through rose colored glasses when remembering the past. My mother taught us that the differences in others were all the same and race or color mattered not. I have always disliked how some treat those that are different.

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    2. Oh to be a child again-in a time we we just played and didnt worry about trends and such-still I am glad for my computer at long last-cell phones too as long as neither replace life and its beauty. Thank you-wishing you a beautiful peaceful day!

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  5. There are some great, simple traditions to behold in an ever changing society. While I’m young, I value those things that encourage creativity and cooperation without the use of modern technology. When I was growing up, I’d often play card games and board games with my parents. When I’d play outside with my friends, we used to make up games and they were the most enjoyable and memorable activities. I try to incorporate that in reading my own children so that they won’t get easily bored.

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  6. Before going to bed I catch time to read this and brought me into a trance.
    I reflect how time changes people.My daughter is growing up totally different from the way I grew up.There’s both a wonder and so as sadness that I feel knowing it seems we grew in 2 different worlds.We don’t have this much technology during my time and we don’t have access to modernity which are so prevalent nowadays.
    With these changes, I think I have changed as well since I,myself is happy that I became the person I am right now.Maybe if I refused to advance then I wouldn’t even here writing a comment about something nice as this.

    Another wonderful read from you Michele ,Thank you for sharing your golden thoughts.
    Have a nice day!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are always so kind-You would think technology and automatic, instant everything would give us more time-instead it seems so rushed all the time-well let us hold on to what was good and throw the rest out-as much as we can. thank you always!

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  7. I agree… I notice that everyone is now hooked to their cell phones, with simple instant chats that are meaningless telegraphic half thoughts or half phrases, which are supposed to substitute a real human connection… Constantly checking what was posted on social media while life itself and precious moments are passing by in a fast pace world… with all the technology that we have as you said, we don’t seem to have or make the time to really be present, mindfully and completely present for family and friends… our attention spans have shorten, we need to speak or read in “tweets” or short paragraphs, otherwise we get inpatient. The joy of savoring stories with full details to make our imagination fly just seems to take too long… I don’t know if there is a turning back from this, all I hope is that we start to wake up and start considering our priorities balancing our lives so that technology does not change the essence of what truly matters to us.

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  8. You are so right on all counts, my friend. I remember as a kid sitting out at night with the entire neighborhood watching the stars come out. It was how we cooled off after the heat of the day. No one had air conditioning at that time.
    As kids we played ball in the summer, sledded in the winter and generally played without adults telling us the right way to play. We played, we fought and we really enjoyed life.
    So many times I wish we could go back to days like that….when we enjoyed relationships face to face.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. I so agree! Our modern conveniences are great, but rather than free up time for our personal use, they simply created a much more demanding life-style than we have ever lived before. Now we must be connected, entertained, taught and informed every waking moment! I think we have indeed “thrown the baby out with the bath” in many ways. Good for you for clinging tightly to that “baby” with both hands!
    PS: I hope it warms up for you soon, though…

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